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Can You Snorkel Off The Beach in Port Douglas?

Last Updated 09/03/2022.

Yes, you can snorkel off the beach in Port Douglas. It’s something I’ve done many times. But read the rest of this post to find out about potential dangers and limitations. Obviously, you snorkel at your own risk.

Port Douglas can you snorkel off the beach
Port Douglas Beach, Four Mile Beach. Showing the stinger net near the lifeguard station and Macrossan St.

Most visitors to Port Douglas come to snorkel on the Great Barrier Reef. For this, you need to take a boat trip, either to the Outer Reef or to Low Isles.

You should have a really good experience at either of these sites although the inner and outer reefs are different.

Snorkelling Off The Beach in Port Douglas

There’s not much to see off Port Douglas beach. Be sure to book a trip to the reef, but yes, for fun, you can snorkel off Port Douglas Beach, so long as you don’t put yourself in any danger.

Is There Anything To See Snorkelling off Port Douglas Beach?

You will see a lot of sand. You will also see some fish, most likely. But there is no beautiful coral reef off Port Douglas Beach.

At very low tides you can see some coral on the beach near the Mowbray River, but that’s not anywhere I’d want to swim! I like to stay as far away as possible from crocodiles.

In stinger season we have snorkelled inside the stinger net. This is quite a fun thing to do and we’ve seen some really huge fish in there, and trapped in the folds of the net, including a huge guitar fish or shovel-nosed shark. The other swimmers in the net were totally unaware he was there!

You must always stay some distance away from the net, as if there is a jellyfish trapped in it, that’s where it will be.

Jellyfish

In Far North Queensland we have “Stinger Season”. This stretches from about November to March and it is the time when there is a possibility of deadly jellyfish in the water.

During this period there is a “Stinger Net” on Port Douglas beach and swimmers, and snorkelers are required to swim in this net.

Boat trips to the reef, and snorkelling, continue throughout stinger season. During this time of year (summer) snorkelers wear stinger suits to protect them from these potentially deadly creatures. Most reef boats provide these.

Crocodiles

Port Douglas is home to quite a few saltwater crocodiles. Very rarely, these are spotted swimming along the beach or even on the beach. If you’re planning to snorkel off Port Douglas beach, keep this in mind.

If the lifeguards have spotted a croc, there should be a “recent crocodile sighting” sign at the beach or body of water where it was seen.

For this reason, I wouldn’t even consider snorkelling in the inlet nor around the headland or towards the Mowbray River. Although, incredibly, I did once see people snorkelling around the Sugar Wharf. Stick to the beach near the lifeguards and don’t take risks.

Time of Year and Visibility Off Port Douglas Beach

Visibility really varies with weather conditions. On some days the water at Port Douglas Beach can be crystal clear, but storms, rain, and strong winds will stir it up into a sandy murk.

That said, a good day is possible at any time of year, even in the worst of the wet season in January and February.

You may also enjoy snorkelling in some of our freshwater swimming holes and waterfalls nearby. Safety should be your first concern, every time. No water activity is ever completely safe and follow the lifeguards’ instructions or any local warning signs, particularly in wet season where we may experience floods. The tropics bring a whole new set of dangers that you may not be used to.

I last visited the reef for snorkelling in early February and enjoyed perfect snorkelling conditions. But do check the weather forecast! I hope this post was helpful. I wrote it because I found wrong information on Google and wanted to get correct information out there. Enjoy your stay in our home town!

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